What I Read in March

What I Read in March 2018

In the midst of March’s snow days, I discovered a new favorite author, Anna Quindlen. I picked up her newest book at the library and that was that! Quindlen’s books are such a breath of fresh air in this never-ending winter that we find ourselves in. Otherwise, my March reads were enjoyable, with nary a dud! And for an April spoiler alert: I’m reading two different trilogies… among many other great books!

Carnegie’s Maid by Marie Benedict

Carnegie’s Maid by Marie BenedictHistorical fiction with an Irish female protagonist: yes! Besides the wonderful Irish culture that I love reading about, this book focused on the Carnegie family. It brought back memories of middle school social studies classes! I enjoyed learning more about the family and what it may have been like to be “new money” during the 1800s. Parts of it fell flat for me (unbelievable love interest, not an empowering lead character) but I enjoyed it as a historical novel. 

 

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage by Tayari JonesAlmost every book-focused instagram account I follow posted a picture of the gorgeous bright blue cover in early 2018. When I saw it just sitting on a bookshelf at the library, I snatched it up! I loved the story, the characters, and of course, the incredible writing. Best of 2018, for sure. Also, it was interesting to have read Just Mercy last month and then read a novel that dealt with racial injustice. It made the story that much more powerful for me knowing that the plot of this story is a reality for many people in our country.

 

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys

Salt to the Sea by Ruta SepetysA YA World War II book. I liked it but I wasn’t wowed by it. It received quite a few awards so my expectations were higher. I do enjoy when I learn something from historical fiction. In this case, I learned about the sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff, a German ship filled with refugees that was torpedoed. The story rotated between four narrators, which I would have enjoyed had the chapters not been so SHORT! Some chapters were just a page or two. It made the story feel like I was jumping around a lot and not investing in a character as much. Had I read this as a teenager, I probably would have loved it, but it just fell a little short for me.

 

Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah

Firefly Lane by Kristin HannahI quickly abandoned Winter Garden by the same author (not my taste) and plunged into this older best seller. I can’t say that the quality of the writing was that great, but I did enjoy it once I got into it. Great if you’re pregnant and want a good cry. It focused on the friendship of women through the decades. There is a sequel but I don’t think I’ll be picking it up.

 

Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks: A Librarian’s Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life by Annie Spence

Dear Fahrenheit 451 by Annie SpenceI love when I can say, “I’ve never read a book like this before.” It was very true of Dear Fahrenheit 451. Written by a librarian to her books, it’s adorable, funny, and had lots of great recommendations. It’s a quick read and great if you feel a bit stuck between books. As a caveat, it does have a lot of (unnecessary) language.

 

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James BrownGoodness, this was a long read. There are two components to this book: rich history of the early 1900s in the West and so many details about rowing. I loved the history. I wouldn’t have wanted less information about the rowing, though. It was a wonderful, inspiring read. Reminiscent of Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken

 

Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen

Oh dear, I found a new favorite author! Where has Anna Quindlen been all my life? Our protagonist is an older photographer who leaves New York for a small town. I won’t say more. It was so lovely!

 

 

 


Alternate Side by Anna Quindlen

Alternate Side by Anna QuindlenBe prepared for reviews on every one of Anna Quindlen’s books!!! I’ve got them on hold at the library. I love when the setting of the novel is so crucial to the text that it is like a character. This is very true for this novel, which takes place in New York. This is the story of an upper-class family but also a story about race. Reviews on Quindlen’s newest novel are mixed but I loved this book.

 

Glory over Everything: Beyond The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

Glory over Everything by Kathleen GrissomI was very surprised that I enjoyed this book as much as I did! I loved Grissom’s The Kitchen House and I did not expect that a second book would live up to the first. Jamie was one of my least favorite characters in The Kitchen House but it was interesting to see his character develop. I liked how the format was similar to The Kitchen House, with one than one narrator. Also, I liked that Grissom didn’t feel find it necessary to check back in on every character from The Kitchen House. She introduced new characters that were just  as wonderful and interesting.

 

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik Backman

And Every Morning the Way Home Gets Longer and Longer by Fredrik BackmanGorgeous novella by the wonderful Fredrik Backman about an elderly man and his grandson. I’m a huge Backman fan and absolutely floored that his books are translated and still read like poetry. 

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