What I Read in February

What I Read in February 2018

Hello Readers! While I haven’t been writing, I have been busy reading (and visiting doctors for this pregnancy!). I finished my least favorite book of the year so far, as well as some other incredible books that took me by surprise. We may already be into spring, but here’s an overview of what I loved and hated in February.

 

Why Did I Even Read These Books:

 

Those Who Save Us by Jenna Blum

those who save usPass! Why this book was on my kindle, I couldn’t tell you. But I found myself on a treadmill without headphones, so I pulled this up on my kindle app. I should have abandoned it early on, when I got to some graphic scenes that added nothing to the novel. I appreciated that the author wanted to tell a World War II story from the perspective of a German woman. There were aspects that I found interesting, but I didn’t like any of the characters. I was glad to be done with it.

 

Sing Unburied Sing by Jesmyn Ward

sing unburied singA supernatural road trip story with a lot of drugs and horrible parenting. What about that description makes people love this book so much? It came highly recommended. I hated it. I don’t even want to talk about it. I know there is some good stuff in here – there must be if people are loving it so much – but it’s not for me.

Great February Reads:

 

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

Just Mercy by Bryan StevensonI wish I could give this book to everyone who struggles to see injustice in our judicial system. I know they wouldn’t read it, though. It’s difficult to read. And yet, there is some hope. I felt grateful for people like Bryan Stevenson who have dedicated their lives to helping the oppressed and making their plight known. Our family is passionate about justice, so this was an obvious read for me, but I do recommend it to anyone.

 

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell

Attachments by Rainbow RowellCute, fast read. Add this to your “beach reads” list! I needed a light read after Pachinko, which was certainly “epic” and a struggle to finish. Rainbow Rowell writes both YA and adult novels, and this was one of her most popular adult novels. I started and abandoned one of her YA novels already – too much teenage angst for me!

 

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely FineA must-read! It is laugh-out-loud funny and also heartbreaking. Such wonderful writing. I turned to Gene again and again to tell him what was happening in the book because I was so excited about it. This is one of the best books of the year for me so far.

The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui

Reading a graphic novel was a first for me! I can’t remember the last time I was so touched by  a memoir. I thought the graphics might be distracting from the story going into it. However, at no point did I wish it was a regular book without the graphics. They enhanced the story. The way Thi Bui weaves history into her memoir, with hand-drawn maps, helped me to understand the history of Vietnam. I wish books like this could be included in history curriculum in schools. It was so much easier to grasp hold of what was happening and how it impacted people than our standard history books.

 

Other Books:

 

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'EngleI read this book in second grade, which if you’re wondering, is too young (in my opinion). I remember nothing about that first read. There are Christian themes in here! Who knew!? I will most likely read this book along with my children as they get older, but I do wonder what age would be appropriate. Gene read this as well and we both finished it and said “huh”. He thought it was similar to C.S. Lewis’s Space Trilogy, which I haven’t read before. I’ll probably pick them up sometime this year since he loved them.

 

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

Pachinko by Min Jin LeeI loved the first third of this book but grew more frustrated with it as it continued. It had everything to do with the characters. Since it was an epic novel that spanned generations, the second and third sections of the book focused on different characters in the family. They grew increasingly shallow. The first section was about a female and the later parts were focused more on the males in the family. This was probably a huge component as well. The males were more educated and more opportunities before them, even though they were minorities (Korean) in Japan. I definitely recommend, but know that the novel changes and focuses on different characters.

Share this post!

One thought on “What I Read in February”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *